Legal Information Institute for China?

The Legal Information Institutes (LIIs) have been spearheading the free access to law movement throughout the world. Until recently, China has been conspicuously absent from the family of LIIs; however, that may soon change.

The Internet Law Review (网络法律评论) from Peking University Law School is working on an upcoming article that focuses on the possibility of forming a legal information institute in China. Keep an eye out for the article tentatively titled: “Law via the Internet: Why there is no LII for China.”

If you are interested in China’s development of a LII or Chinese legal research in general, you may wish to attend the the Chinese and American Forum on Legal Information and Law Libraries (CAFLL) Conference scheduled for Shanghai from June 11-12, 2013. CAFLL conferences offer a unique opportunity for Chinese and foreign law librarians to exchange ideas and expertise.

Additional conference information is available at the CAFLL Website:

http://cafllnet.org/annual-conference/

Wishing our Chinese colleagues good luck with promoting free access to law in China.

Expert Commentaries Posted on the China Guiding Cases Project

Stanford’s China Guiding Cases Project has recently posted two expert commentaries on the first batch of guiding cases released by the Supreme People’s Court. Both commentaries are available in English and Chinese.

Prof. Wang Chenguang of Tsinghua University School of Law comments on the differences between Chinese Guiding Cases and stare decisis in common law countries. Prof. Wang’s commentary also addresses some of the still unresolved issues of how courts will apply the Guiding Cases in practice.

https://cgc.law.stanford.edu/expert-commentary/2-professor-wang/

Chief Judge Jiang Heping of the First Civil Division of the Dongguan Municipality No. 2 People’s Court in Guangdong Province discusses the second Guiding Case, Wu Mei v. Meishan Xicheng Paper Co., Ltd. of Sichuan Province involving the role of settlements in the Chinese legal system. The case clarifies the distinctions among settlement, mediation, and adjudication in Chinese courts. Chief Judge Jiang’s court has been designated a “Court for National ADR Initiative” by the Supreme People’s Court.

https://cgc.law.stanford.edu/expert-commentary/1-judge-jiang/

The CGCP team is busy working on China law summaries on specific areas of law. Look for these to be posted soon on the Web site. The first law summaries will probably cover contract law, criminal law, environmental law, and alternative dispute resolution.

China Guiding Cases Project

https://cgc.law.stanford.edu/