French Legal Guides from EducNet – Guides Juridique Legamedia

The French Ministry of Higher Education and Research has posted a handful of thematic legal guides on their EducNet site. Guides are able for copyright, protection of children online, cultural property, privacy, human rights, and regulation of teachers and professors. All information is available only in French.

Guides Juridique Legamedia

http://www.educnet.education.fr/legamedia

Using Bing Search Engine for Foreign Legal Research

The Bing search engine seems to be indexing  specific resources from LexisNexis. For example, a search of  [france lexis] produced the following result in position number four:

Full Search results: http://www.bing.com/search?q=lexis+france&entrypoint=IE-SearchBox&FORM=LENIE

This link leads directly to LexisNexis’ Doing Business in France (File Name DBFRAN). Although very useful, Bing does not provide a title for the link; it only provides the www.lexis.com title. Similar searches for Russian statutes [russia lexis laws] lead directly to LexisNexis’ Economic Laws of the Russian Federation database , but again failed to include the publication name in the link. 

Full search results for [russia lexis laws]: http://www.bing.com/search?q=russia+lexis+laws&entrypoint=IE-SearchBox&FORM=LENIE

Bing’s searching of LexisNexis resources is welcome, but here’s hoping that the links can be made much more  informative.

I was not able to locate specific Westlaw database links using Bing, or at least they did not appear in the top 5 results. 

Bing Search Engine

http://www.bing.com/

Morrison & Foerster Privacy Library

Morrison & Foerster maintains a wonderful “Privacy Library” of statutes, regulations,  links to government institutions, and IGO & NGO reports. This includes all 50 states and many foreign countries. The foreign country pages provide the laws and regulations in the vernacular and in English when avialable. All of this is available free of charge.

Hat tip to Paul for finding this resource.

Morrison & Foerster Privacy Library

http://www.mofoprivacy.com/

eYou Guide – European Union Guide to Internet Rights

The European Commission has created a Web site for citizens to learn about EU Internet law, e-commerce,  privacy rights online, and copying digital content. Although not designed for attorneys, the site does link to the full-text of legislation and case law mentioned in the text.

eYou Guide to your rights online          http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/eyouguide/navigation/index_en.htm

 

Examples of questions addresed by eYouGuide site:

Protecting privacy

Tips and precautions you should take in order to prevent misuse of your personal information online.

Can the company that provides my internet connection see which sites I visit? If so, how do they use this information?

What you should know about the consumer contracts, unfair terms and delivery of goods bought online.

Shopping online

When buying goods/services online, what are the consequences of clicking “I have read and approved the terms & conditions”?

Safety & security

Concerns about the security of your computer, Internet connection or safety of your online payments.

What are the risks of using social networking websites?

Copyright & IPR

What you should know about your rights and obligations related to music files, movies, CDs and DVDs and books online.

Can I lawfully copy images and texts I found on the internet?   

Can I record streaming video and audio?

Disabled, older people

Access to and use of online services for older people and people with disabilities.

I am a blind user and sometimes I have difficulties accessing some literary or artistic works online. What can I do about this?

Who’s liable?

How to find who is responsible for illegal content online and for faulty goods sold or advertised on the internet.

Can an online seller be held liable for faulty products?

Who is going to pay for the damages caused by a defective product bought online?

French court decisions – IP and information technology cases

Juriscom.net and Le Forum des droits sur l’internet provide timely access to full-text or synopses of information technology, Internet and IP law decisions from French (and occasionally Belgium) courts, including courts of first instance, courts of appeals and the Court of CassationLe forum des droits sur l’internet adds keywords to all decisions, thereby facilitating subject access to the case law. Both sites also offer news reports and articles.  All materials are available in French only. Merci beaucoup to our friends in France for making this case law available to us free of charge.

Juriscom.net                                                                                                                   http://www.juriscom.net/

Le Forum des droits sur l’internet                            http://www.foruminternet.org/ Click on “veille juridique” to find the court decisions.

Did someone say FREE?

Free is one of my favorite words. So, you can imagine how excited I was to learn of the “Free Book of the Month” on Fastcase.  Every month, Fastcase hosts a free legal book (oftentimes these are books that have fallen out of copyright) and post the PDF on their website.  

This month’s book is: The Future of the Internet and How To Stop It, by Jonathan Zittrain.

Here is a short description of the book from: futureoftheinternet.org

“This extraordinary book explains the engine that has catapulted the Internet from backwater to ubiquity—and reveals that it is sputtering precisely because of its runaway success. With the unwitting help of its users, the generative Internet is on a path to a lockdown, ending its cycle of innovation—and facilitating unsettling new kinds of control.”

“IPods, iPhones, Xboxes, and TiVos represent the first wave of Internet-centered products that can’t be easily modified by anyone except their vendors or selected partners. These “tethered appliances” have already been used in remarkable but little-known ways: car GPS systems have been reconfigured at the demand of law enforcement to eavesdrop on the occupants at all times, and digital video recorders have been ordered to self-destruct thanks to a lawsuit against the manufacturer thousands of miles away. New Web 2.0 platforms like Google mash-ups and Facebook are rightly touted—but their applications can be similarly monitored and eliminated from a central source. As tethered appliances and applications eclipse the PC, the very nature of the Internet—its “generativity,” or innovative character—is at risk.”

“The Internet’s current trajectory is one of lost opportunity. Its salvation, Zittrain argues, lies in the hands of its millions of users. Drawing on generative technologies like Wikipedia that have so far survived their own successes, this book shows how to develop new technologies and social structures that allow users to work creatively and collaboratively, participate in solutions, and become true “netizens.””

The Future of the Internet and How To Stop It (PDF)