Another Timely CRS Report — “Syria’s Chemical Weapons: Issues for Congress”

Another timely Congressional Research Service (CRS) report

  • Syria’s Chemical Weapons:
    Issues for Congress
    By Mary Beth D. Nikitin
    Specialist in Nonproliferation
    & Paul K. Kerr
    Analyst in Nonproliferation
    & Andrew Feickert
    Specialist in Military Ground Forces
    August 20, 2013 [R42848]

is here.

Hat tip to Docuticker.com.

Cross-posted at Law Librarian Blog.

“Judges and Their Papers” by Kathryn A. Watts, Univ. of Washington School of Law — Who should own a federal judge’s papers?

University of Washington (UW) School of Law Associate Professor Kathryn A. Watt’s subject, thought-provoking paper is here.

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog.

Cross-posted at Law Library Blog.

New Congressional Research Service (CRS) Report: “The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA): Background and Policy Options for the 113th Congress”

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) earlier this month released and posted a valuable new Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)-related report:

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA): Background and Policy Options for the 113th Congress
By Wendy Ginsberg, Analyst in American National Government
March 8, 2013
R41933

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

Bloomberg Law (BLAW) Wins American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) 2012 New Product Award

Bloomberg Law (BLAW) has won the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) 2012 new product award, recognizing BLAW’s innovation in providing access to legal information.

Please see:

BLOOMBERG LAW NAMED 2012 NEW PRODUCT OF THE YEAR BY THE AALL

&

(AALL) NEW PRODUCT AWARD

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog here.

Congressional Lawmaking: A Perspective On Secrecy and Transparency

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) late last year put out an interesting report on lawmaking in the U.S. Congress:

Congressional Lawmaking: A Perspective On Secrecy and Transparency

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

The Power of Open Data — Case Study: How Open Data Saved Canada $3.2 Billion

A most interesting and valuable case study of savings for the public purse in Canada from the use of open data — by exposing a large tax fraud involving charitable receipts – is:

Case Study: How Open Data Saved Canada $3.2 Billion
by David Eaves

As Eaves writes, in essence, “the power of open data” is “the power to find problems in complicated environments, and possibly even to prevent them from emerging.”

See also Eaves’ three laws of open government data post:
  1. If it can’t be spidered or indexed, it doesn’t exist [i.e., can the data be found?].
  2. If it isn’t available in open and machine readable format, it can’t engage [i.e., to be useful, one needs to be able to play with the data].
  3. If a legal framework doesn’t allow it to be repurposed, it doesn’t empower [i.e., a legal framework is necessary to allow sharing of the data].

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog, referring in turn to Pew Internet’s Susannah Fox, The Power of Data and the Power of One.

New Congressional Research Report on Lobbying the Executive Branch

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) came out in December 2009 with a new and helpful report:

Lobbying the Executive Branch: Current Practices and Options for Change

The report addresses, among other things:

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog.

Cross-posted in Law Library Blog.

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom Starts Up Today

The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom (UK) starts up today.

It will be an independent institution and take over the jurisdiction of Appellate Committee of the House of Lords, as well as the devolution jurisdiction of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.

The intent of the new high court is to “provide greater clarity” in the UK’s “constitutional arrangements by further separating the judiciary from the legislature.”

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog.

US National Archives Materials Found in UK Archives

Law Librarian Blog today features an interesting post about items missing from the U.S. National Archives, likely through employee theft.

See Missing Items from US Archive, Found Item in UK Archive.

See also the National Archives webpage Missing Historical Documents and Items.

And see the U.K. National Archives news item Lost Page of American History Found at The National Archives about a rare print of America’s Declaration of Independence (dated 4 July 1776), named after printer John Dunlap (1747-1812) — one of only 26 known copies in the world — recently found among files at the British Archives at Kew.

Nice to have some redundancy, even if all the way across the Pond!

New Sunlight Labs Project for 50 States’ Legislation

Sunlight Labs, creator of OpenCongress, has started a new wiki project for obtaining data files for legislation,
legislators and votes in each of the 50 states. Volunteers are welcome!

Hat tip to today’s Law Librarian Blog.