Classroom cooperation among foreign law schools

Legal Education Digest (v.16 #2 pp. 46-49), published a condensed version of the following article by Daniel Bradlow and Jay Finkelstein: “Training Law Students to be International Transactional Lawyers – Using an Extended Simulation to Educate Law Students About Business Transactions.”  This article describes an international business transactions course jointly taught by Amercian University Washington Colleg eof Law and Dundee University’s Centre for Energy, Mineral, and Petroleum Law and Policy.  One class represents the buyer, a  U.S. drug company and the other class represents the seller, a state-owned agricultural cooperative in an African country. 

Full text available via SSRN: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1084071

Article Abstact:

The article describes an innovative approach to educating law students about the legal issues and the role of lawyers in negotiating international business transactions. It is based on our experiences in developing and teaching a course that is built around a semester-long simulation exercise and taught in counterpart classes at two law schools. The students in these classes represent the opposing parties and negotiate a cross-border business transaction involving a joint venture agreement, a licensing agreement and a long-term supply contract. The students, who attend either the American University Washington College of Law or the Centre for Energy Mineral and Petroleum Law and Policy at the Dundee University in Scotland, utilize written communications, video-conferencing and teleconferencing in their negotiations. In the paper we discuss the value the course adds to the education of our students, the challenges and pleasures of teaching the course, the response of students to the innovative approach to teaching, and ways in which the course could be adapted and enriched.