Signed, sealed, delivered

Adobe bloger John B. Harris is reporting the first instance of a judge signing an order digitally.  The order was signed by the Honorable John M. Facciola of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.  As Harris notes, in the past orders (etc.) have been printed out, signed by hand, and then re-scanned to be added to the courts electronic filing system, adding both time and expense to the filing process.

“By keeping the generation, signing and filing of the order completely electronic, the process is made much more efficient, potentially driving costs down and making the court’s systems work more effectively.”

A less costly, more efficient court filing process?  Can low cost/no cost access to PACER be far behind?  We can only hope (and keep on petitioning).

Update: Mea culpa, it seems our readers have been more discerning in their research than I was.  Check out the comments for a better take on this story.

3 thoughts on “Signed, sealed, delivered

  1. You seem to have been taken in by Adobe’s marketing spin. Perhaps Judge Facciola’s signing was the first time a judge used Adobe-specific digital-signature technology. But judges around the country have been digitally signing orders for years, simply by having their staff type “s/Judge So-and-So” in the signature line of the order docketed by chambers. The idea that judges routinely sign and re-scan their orders is simply nonsense. Take a look at any recent order in the District of Minnesota for examples.

  2. We’ve been stamping orders with Adobe signatures in this bankruptcy court for 7 years (and I don’t mean with a /s, but with an actual digital signature)! There certainly have been no pen and ink around here in ages — you should do your homework before claiming this judge signed the first ever digital order!

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