World Economic Forum (WEF) White Paper: Internet Fragmentation

The World Economic Forum (WEF) has recently posted the white paper

Internet Fragmentation: An Overview (January 2016)

From the Executive Summary (page 3/6 of the PDF) of the document:

…the Internet is in some danger of splintering or breaking up into loosely coupled islands of connectivity. A number of potentially troubling trends driven by technological developments, government policies and commercial practices have been rippling across the Internet’s layers….

The growth of these concerns does not indicate a pending cataclysm. The Internet remains stable and generally open and secure in its foundations, and it is morphing and incorporating new capabilities that open up extraordinary new horizons, from the Internet of Things and services to the spread of block chain technology and beyond. … But there are challenges accumulating which, if left unattended, could chip away to varying degrees at the Internet’s enormous capacity to facilitate human progress. We need to take stock of these….

The purpose of this document is to contribute to the emergence of a common baseline understanding of Internet fragmentation. It maps the landscape of some of the key trends and practices that have been variously described as constituting Internet fragmentation and highlights 28 examples.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Proposes Revisions to U.S. Government’s Governing Document on Information Resources

The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has recently proposed — for the first time in 15 years — revisions to U.S. Government’s governing document — Circular No. A-130 — on information resources — please see here.

Public comments were requested — please see here.

Please see here, herehere and here for coverage of/reporting on/criticism regarding the proposal.

Cross-posted at Law Library Blog.

Max Planck Digital Library Open Access Policy White Paper: “Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model…”

Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access

A Max Planck Digital Library Open Access Policy White Paper

Published: 28 April 2015
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17617/1.3
License: CC-BY 4.0, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Authors: Ralf Schimmer¹, Kai Karin Geschuhn¹, Andreas Vogler¹
Contact: schimmer@mpdl.mpg.de

¹ Max Planck Digital Library, Amalienstraße 33, 80799 München, Germany

 

Abstract
This paper makes the strong, fact-based case for a large-scale transformation of the current corpus of scientific subscription journals to an open access business model. The existing journals, with their well-tested functionalities, should be retained and developed to meet the demands of 21st century research, while the underlying payment streams undergo a major restructuring. There is sufficient momentum for this decisive push towards open access publishing. The diverse existing initiatives must be coordinated so as to converge on this clear goal. The international nature of research implies that this transformation will be achieved on a truly global scale only through a consensus of the world’s most eminent research organizations. All the indications are that the money already invested in the research publishing system is sufficient to enable a transformation that will be sustainable for the future. There needs to be a shared understanding
that the money currently locked in the journal subscription system must be withdrawn and repurposed for open access publishing services. The current library acquisition budgets are the ultimate reservoir for enabling the transformation without financial or other risks. The goal is to preserve the established service levels provided by publishers that are still requested by researchers, while redefining and reorganizing the necessary payment streams. By disrupting the underlying business model, the viability of journal publishing can be preserved and put on a solid footing for the scholarly developments of the future.

American Library Association (ALA) Report: The State of America’s Libraries 2015

The American Library Association (ALA) has issued the report:

The State of America’s Libraries 2015

For the associated press release, “New State of America’s Libraries Report finds shift in role of U.S. libraries,” please see here.

From the press release:

[A]cademic, public and school libraries are experiencing a shift in how they are perceived by their communities and society. No longer just places for books, libraries of all types are viewed as anchors, centers for academic life and research and cherished spaces.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

University of North Texas (UNT) Annual Open Access Symposia: 2015 Symposium “Open Access and the Law”

The University of North Texas (UNT), in furtherance of its commitment to the global open access movement, sponsors an annual symposium on Open Access.

Please see here for information about previous years’ events, speakers and presentations.

The 2015 symposium’s theme is “Open Access and the Law.”

The scheduled dates of the 2015 symposium — at the UNT Dallas College of Law — are Monday-Tuesday, May 18-19, 2015.

It will open on Monday evening May 18th with a reception.

Substantive programs will then take place the following day.

Speakers will include individuals working on the authentication of electronic legal materials as well as on institutional repositories.

More information on the 2015 symposium will become available soon.

Cross-posted at Law Library Blog.

New Email-Alerts System from U.S. Library of Congress for Tracking Legislative Action on Congress.gov

Earlier this month the U.S. Library of Congress made available — on Congress.gov — “a new optional email-alerts system that makes tracking legislative action even easier.”

Please see the explanatory news release “Congress.gov Offers Users New Alert System” of 5-Feb-2015 here.

Pilot Program to Put Court Transcripts in the Cloud

A pilot program in Fresno, California to create and distribute court transcripts in The Cloud offers hope on the legal transcript front — please see:

Sean Doherty, Law Technology News

See also here for YesLAW Online.

Cross-posted at Law Library Blog.

Legal Affairs Committee of Council of Europe’s Parliamentary Assembly States that Mass Surveillance Practices “Endanger Fundamental Human Rights”

A new report of the Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights of the Parliamentary Assembly (PACE), Council of Europe states that the mass surveillance practices disclosed by US whistleblower Edward Snowden “endanger fundamental human rights.”

The report is here.

Please see the accompanying press release here.

“PubAg,” User-Friendly Search Engine, Debuts at the U.S. National Agricultural Library

The U.S. National Agricultural Library (NAL) has debuted PubAg, a user-friendly search engine, which provides “enhanced access” to the public to search for and obtain research published by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

The NAL is part of USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS).

Please see here for the USDA’s press release about PubAg.

World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF’s) “Living Planet Report 2014”

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has recently released its Living Planet Report 2014 — for the full report, please see here.

Unfortunately, biodiversity on earth seems to be in worse shape than ever and is declining in both temperate and tropical regions of the earth, although the decline is reportedly greater in the tropics.

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