Top Employers for Energy Law in Germany

Azur magazine’s latest issue profiles the top law firms, corporations, and government agencies in Germany working on energy law. This issue also includes an article on energy project planning in Germany and the EU. All materials are in German.

Azur JUVE Karrieremagazin für junge Juristen
01/2011
Top-Arbeitgeber im Energiewirtschaftsrecht (Best Employers in Energy Law)
Parissa Kerkhoff
pages 57-61.

The article is not online, but Azur’s homepage is available at:
http://www.azur-online.de/nachrichten/

 

 

Documentary on Jean Monnet

Professor Don Smith of the University of Denver Strum College of Law has produced and posted a 90 minute documentary  on the life of Jean Monnet, one of the architects of the European Community. The film provides an interesting look into the genesis of the institutions that produced the European Union and the remarkable life of Jean Monnet.

Jean Monnet Father of Europe

http://www.law.du.edu/index.php/jean-monnet-father-of-europe

From the project description:

Jean Monnet has been called “The Father of Europe” by those who see his innovative and pioneering efforts in the 1950s as the key to establishing the European Coal and Steel Community, the predecessor of today’s European Union.

Jean Monnet’s concept of “European community” was aimed at ending the ceaseless wars on the European continent and enhancing prosperity. And yet today in Europe – to say nothing of the rest of the world – Monnet is often a forgotten historical figure, his contributions to peace and prosperity in Europe largely overlooked.

In commemoration of this 20th century giant, 18 months ago Don C. Smith, who teaches “European Union Law & Policy” and “European Union Environmental Law & Policy” at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, embarked on an effort to produce a video documentary explaining who Monnet was and what his legacy is.

Mr. Smith’s interviews capture the observations and insight of those who worked with Monnet in the key years of the 1950s as well as individuals who have been influenced by Monnet’s contributions to European integration.

hat tip to Joan Policastri

Legal Research Methods in a Modern World: A Coursebook

Together with my Stanford Law School colleague George D. Wilson and our friend and Danish legal scholar Henrik Spang-Hanssen, we have just published the third edition of our legal research book, a revision of Legal Research Methods in the U.S. and Europe, 2nd Edition.  But with the inclusion of short but good (in my opinion) chapters on legal research in China and Russia and some other materials, we have changed the title to Legal Research Methods in a Modern World: A Coursebook.

The book, now weighing in at 453 pages (and bargain priced at $ 55.00), is rich with illustrations and peppered with legal research tips.  My contribution is mainly Chapter 5, about legal research methods in the United States, and it is based upon and follows the advanced legal research class that I co-teach here at Stanford.  New to this edition, in addition to other updates, is the inclusion of research exercises that we have found most useful from the class.  I did not include the answers — because I hope to continue to use these exercises — but I would be very happy to share the answers and my thoughts on approaches with other instructors of legal research.

The legal world is certainly getting smaller, and it is our shared belief that this would be handy book for any attorney to have as he or she deals with lawyers from other countries and their legal cultures.

The book should be available from Amazon.com; but if not, or if you want to order copies in mass quantities, the U.S. distributor is International Specialized Book Services.  For other countries, the distributor is Marston Book Services.

We also have a corresponding website here.

EU: Brussels Blogger Study 2010

Waggener Edstrom has published a 16 page report on influential bloggers on European Union affairs. You may request a copy at the following link :

Brussels Blogger Study 2010: The Influence Index

http://www.waggeneredstrom.eu/influence

The top 5 blogs:

BBC Gavin Hewitt’s Europe

FT Brussels Blog

The Digger

Fistfulof Euros

Jon Worth/Euroblog

Report on the Long-Term future of the European Union

The European Union recently released the following report:

Project Europe 2030: Challenges and Opportunities. A report to the European Council by the Reflection Group on the Future of the EU 2030.

http://www.reflectiongroup.eu/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/reflection_en_web.pdf

Report Chapters:

RENEWING EUROPE’S ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL MODEL

GROWTH THROUGH KNOWLEDGE: EMPOWERING THE INDIVIDUAL…

THE CHALLENGE OF DEMOGRAPHY: AGEING, MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION

ENERGY SECURITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE: A NEW INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL SECURITY: THE ETERNAL CHALLENGE

EUROPE IN THE WORLD: BECOMING AN ASSERTIVE PLAYER

THE EU AND ITS CITIZENS

BUILDING ON THE EU’S STRENGTHS

Members of the Reflection Group and authors of the report:

Felipe González Márquez, Chairman

Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga, Vice-Chair

Jorma Ollila, Vice-Chair

Lykke Friis (until November 2009)

Rem Koolhaas

Richard Lambert

Mario Monti

Rainer Münz

Kalypso Nicolaïdis

Nicole Notat

Wolfgang Schuster

Lech Wałęsa

Hartwell Paper: A New Direction for Climate Change

The London School of Economics and Political Science recently released:  Hartwell Paper: A New Direction for Climate Change.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/mackinderProgramme/theHartwellPaper/

From the Executive Summary:

Climate policy, as it has been understood and practised by many governments of the world under the Kyoto Protocol approach, has failed to produce any discernable real world reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases in fifteen years. The underlying reason for this is that the UNFCCC/Kyoto model was structurally flawed and doomed to fail because it systematically misunderstood the nature of climate change as a policy issue between 1985 and 2009. However, the currently dominant approach has acquired immense political momentum because of the quantities of political capital sunk into it. But in any case the UNFCCC/Kyoto model of climate policy cannot continue because it crashed in late 2009. The Hartwell Paper sets and reviews this context; but doing so is not its sole or primary purpose.

The crash of 2009 presents an immense opportunity to set climate policy free to fly at last. The principal motivation and purpose of this Paper is to explain and to advance this opportunity. To do so involves understanding and accepting a startling proposition. It is now plain that it is not possible to have a ‘climate policy’ that has emissions reductions as the all encompassing goal. However, there are many other reasons why the decarbonisation of the global economy is highly desirable. Therefore, the Paper advocates a radical reframing – an inverting – of approach: accepting that decarbonisation will only be achieved successfully as a benefit contingent upon other goals which are politically attractive and relentlessly pragmatic.

The Paper therefore proposes that the organising principle of our effort should be the raising up of human dignity via three overarching objectives: ensuring energy access for all; ensuring that we develop in a manner that does not undermine the essential functioning of the Earth system; ensuring that our societies are adequately equipped to withstand the risks and dangers that come from all the vagaries of climate, whatever their cause may be.

It explains radical and practical ways to reduce non-CO2 human forcing of climate. It argues that improved climate risk management is a valid policy goal, and is not simply congruent with carbon policy. It explains the political prerequisite of energy efficiency strategies as a first step and documents how this can achieve real emissions reductions. But, above all, it emphasises the primacy of accelerating decarbonisation of energy supply. This calls for very substantially increased investment in innovation in non-carbon energy sources in order to diversify energy supply technologies. The ultimate goal of doing this is to develop non-carbon energy supplies at unsubsidised costs less than those using fossil fuels. The Hartwell Paper advocates funding this work by low hypothecated (dedicated) carbon taxes. It opens discussion on how to channel such money productively.

To reframe the climate issue around matters of human dignity is not just noble or necessary. It is also likely to be more effective than the approach of framing around human sinfulness –which has failed and will continue to fail.

European Parliament Video: Legislative Amendment Process

Europarl TV has produced a short 2 minute and 30 second video on the legislative amendment process in the European Parliament. 

The Art of the Amendment

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/public/story_page/008-72110-096-04-15-901-20100406STO72099-2010-06-04-2010/default_en.htm

Life Cycle Thinking and Assessment

The European Commission has created a Web site devoted to the environmental impact of designing, manufacturing, and disposing of products, services, and energy. The site includes publications and a glossary. Life cycle information impacts agriculture, manufacturing, energy, waste management, constriction, and retail sales.

Life Cycle Thinking and Assessment

http://lct.jrc.ec.europa.eu/index_jrc

From the description

Life Cycle Thinking (LCT) seeks to identify possible improvements to goods and services in the form of lower environmental impacts and reduced use of resources across all life cycle stages. This begins with raw material extraction and conversion, then manufacture and distribution, through to use and/or consumption. It ends with re-use, recycling of materials, energy recovery and ultimate disposal.

The key aim of Life Cycle Thinking is to avoid burden shifting. This means minimising impacts at one stage of the life cycle, or in a geographic region, or in a particular impact category, while helping to avoid increases elsewhere. For example, saving energy during the use phase of a product, while not increasing the amount of material needed to provide it.

Taking a life cycle perspective requires a policy developer, environmental manager or product designer to look beyond their own knowledge and in-house data. It requires cooperation up and down the supply chain. At the same time, it also provides an opportunity to use the knowledge that has been gathered to gain signicant economic advantages.

Erich Pommer Institute – German Media Law

The Erich Pommer Institute in Potsdam, Germany maintains an online catalog of its library holdings related to German and  EU media law, entertainment law or IP issues.  The library catalog records are searchable by year, theme, and keyword. Very few full-text items are listed; however, it is a useful site for literature searches and collection development.  Search interface is in German, but catalog entries include various languages.

Erich Pommer Institut Bibliothek 

http://www.epi-medieninstitut.de/Bibliothek_de.html

European Council Procedures and Documents

The UK House of Commons European Scrutiny Committee’s report “Conclusions of the European Council and Council of Ministers (HC-86)”  provides a brief outline of procedures and documentation of the Council of the European Union (European Council), the European Union  body the represents the EU member states. Read the report to learn more about  “limité” documents, COREPER, and the General Affairs and External Relations Council.

House of Commons Report: Conclusions of the European Council and Council of Ministers

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmeuleg/86/86.pdf

Hat tip to Patrick Overy and his Globalex article: European Union: A Guide to Tracing Working Documents.  http://www.nyulawglobal.org/globalex/European_Union_Travaux_Preparatoires.htm