Roman Legal Tradition Journal

Roman Legal Tradition

http://www.romanlegaltradition.org/

From the journal description:

Roman Legal Tradition is a peer-reviewed journal published online by the Ames Foundation and the University of Glasgow School of Law. ISSN 1943-6483.

The journal aims to promote the study of the civilian tradition in English. The editors welcome contributions on any aspect of the civilian tradition in ancient, medieval, and modern law.

All articles and reviews published in Roman Legal Tradition are available from this site free of charge. In addition, all articles and reviews are also available to subscribers of HeinOnline. We encourage readers to use and distribute these materials as they see fit, but ask readers not to make any commercial use of these materials without seeking the consent of the editors and relevant authors.

 

New Journal: Climate and Development

Earthscan has released a new peer-reviewed journal: “Climate and Development.” 

Published in partnership with the Global Change System for Analysis, Research and Training (START), and supported by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA)

Unfortunately, the cost is $608 for U.S. institutions. Some free content from Voulme 1, Issue 1 is currently available on the journal Web site: 

Climate and Development

http://www.earthscan.co.uk/?tabid=29957

hat tip to Joan Policastri.

New journal: European Labour Law Journal

Intersentia Publishing will release the inaugural voluem of European Labour Law Journal later in 2009. No word on subscription price yet. The first issue will publish papers presented at the Future of Labour Law in Europe Conference in June, 2009.

European Labour Law Journal  http://www.intersentia.com/upload/aankondiging%20ELLJ.pdf

About the European Labour Law Journal

The European Labour Law Journal is set to increase and foster the debate on the future of labour law in Europe and to increase the knowledge of labour law.

It aims to better define the role of labour law in Europe and in light of a European Social Model which can provide solutions for the challenges facing the EU and its Member States, requiring a good combination of economic market performance and quality of life, good work and social justice.

In order to contribute to this, the Journal is set to study European labour law in its national, EU and international contexts. Current and future developments in Europe and the world necessitate a fundamental investigation of labour law in the EU and its Member States, and of the basic principles of labour law in Europe.

The Journal fills an existing gap in the academic community. Although there are many national and some internationally oriented labour law journals, none of them specifically addresses the EU as a central focus of attention, including developments of labour law in the EU at the level of the Member States.

Concept

The European Labour Law Journal aims to be a leading academic journal in the area of European labour law and social policy. European labour law is viewed in a wide sense. It includes labour law at the European Union level as well as labour law in the Member States. It also pays attention to developments of labour law at a more global level and its relevance for the EU and its Member States. These various levels are seen as intrinsically connected and mutually interdependent.

The scope of the Journal is confined with:

 

EU labour law and social policy taken in its internal and external dimension;

 

The interaction between EU labour law and Member States’ labour law, including relevant national developments of labour law;

 

Developments of labour law in doctrine and policy at a global level and their relevance for labour law in Europe;

 

Cross-disciplinary developments relating to social policy and industrial relations and their relevance for labour law in Europe.

Attention is paid to developments at the level of policy, legislation, case law as well as academic doctrine.

EJIL Talk! – new blog from the European Journal of International Law

Earlier this week, the European Journal of International Law started their own blog: EJIL Talk!.  Interesting to note inthe third paragraph of the blog description below how the editors hope the blog and the journal will interact. EJIL Talk! will be devoted to current issues and the journal will focus on theoretical arguments and articles that will have a long-term resonance. With talk in the title, perhaps they will also include audio clips in the near future.  

Hat tip to Jacob Katz Cogan’s International LawReporter Blog.

EJIL Talk!

 http://www.ejiltalk.org/

Description of the blog:

EJIL already has a homepage www.ejil.org, the autonomous website of the European Journal of International Law. Our website was a pioneer long before publishers such as our current publisher, OUP, moved into digital journal publishing, and it is distinct from all other mainline journals of which we are aware. Not only is a sizeable portion of current content made free to the reader, but all content becomes free one year after publication – the scholarly world’s Napster! I say all this to indicate that we are not parvenus to the notion of digital internet publishing

The decision to experiment with a blog – and an experiment it is – was decidedly not a bandwagon effect – they all have it, so should we. It is the result of serious reflection of the Editorial Board, with our Scientific Advisory Board, on the evolving relationship between traditional and digital forms of scholarship and publishing. In its first twenty years, EJIL from time to time made huge efforts to provide ‘services’ e.g.  the now defunct service on decisions of the ECJ on matters of International Law or our running commentary on decisions of the WTO Appellate Body of importance to public international lawyers. That, for the most part, has become a redundant and futile exercise rendered such by the power of ‘search engines’ and the ubiquity of primary sources on the internet. EJIL also tried to be ‘topical’ by, e.g., trying to hold symposia on recent decisions of the ICJ, or an ILC Report, or certain ‘incidents’ as soon as possible after the event. In the old days a time lag of six to nine months was considered very topical. That has become laughable – our production process, even at its best, is a tortoise to the internet hare.

And yet, there is, we think, an EJIL sensibility – with, say, its panache for the theoretical article, for aggressively bringing in younger scholars, for its intellectually diverse modes of analysis, realism mixed with doctrine, a strong appeal to, and interest in, history, to mention but a few. (To some Europeans, too Americanized; to some Americans, too European – we take comfort in that debate…). If our new blog EJIL:Talk! is successful, it will continue to reflect those EJIL sensibilities on the internet but enable us to effect a certain mutation in the identity of EJIL itself: We will give increasing preference to articles which deal with the fundamentals, with First Things, which look at an ‘Incident’ or ‘decision of a Tribunal’ with a view to exploring wide systemic meaning; in short, to articles which we predict will have lasting value – that will be interesting four or five or more years after publication. EJIL:Talk! and EJIL may thus complement each other. Note – we hope it does not provoke just short off the cuff academic gossipmentary, but short, incisive, even well-researched pieces which should simply be thought of as a different genre of writing, not unlike the difference between an article and a book.

Online article repository: E-Prints Complutense

E-Prints Complutense is a full-text repository of articles, dissertations and theses written by faculty and students of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Spain. The database allows browsing by subject and author, in addition to keyword searches. The repository covers many subjects in addition to law, so it should be particularly useful for interdisciplinary research.  Muchas gracias a nuestros colegas madrileños.

E-Prints Complutense   http://eprints.ucm.es/

A Tiny Heart Beating: Student-Edited Legal Periodicals in Good Ol’ Europe

A Tiny Heart Beating: Student-Edited Legal Periodicals in Good Ol’ Europe

ILSU Working Paper No. 2008-12/EN

LUIGI RUSSI, Bocconi University

FEDERICO LONGOBARDI, affiliation not provided to SSRN

This paper has a twofold aim: to analyze the possible opportunities disclosed by the observed growth of student-edited law reviews in Europe and to propose an innovative model of student participation to legal publication.

The first part explores the phenomenon of student-edited law reviews in the U.S., focusing on its recognized educational benefits. Among others, it is observed that participation in student-edited law reviews might promote greater scholarly maturity among J.D. students, who might in turn be better equipped for a career in the academia after finishing law school, in comparison to their same-age European peers. Hence, there follows an examination of the possible beneficial repercussions that the establishment of student-edited law reviews may yield on the process of faculty education in (continental) Europe, in light of the general practice therein endorsed of academic “apprenticeship” under a mentor. Such benefits may consist, among others, in the enticement of larger numbers of potential academicians and in their possible greater intellectual maturity, providing new meaning to the aforementioned time-honored European practice.

The second part of the paper focuses, instead, on the drawbacks brought about by excessive proliferation of student-edited law reviews in the U.S., such as alleged decrease in the quality of published scholarship as a consequence of the superficial quality control that student editors sometimes perform. In view of the foregoing, an innovative model of student publication is proposed, in order to prevent the onset of such drawbacks in Europe, while retaining the above-outlined benefits of early student involvement in academic discourse. It is suggested to complement few, authoritative sources of published scholarship in the form of peer-reviewed journals with student-edited working paper series which, if based on the guideline to provide substantial constructive feedback to authors, could ultimately help foster a quality improvement of published scholarship.

Source: LSN Legal Writing Vol. 3 No. 15,  08/18/2008