UNRIC Backgrounders

The United Nations Regional Information Centre for Western Europe Backgrounders are a great resource for locating UN documents and sites covering international law topics and selected countries
These guides provide links to treaties, UN resolutions, UN press releases, UN reports and UN Web sites. Many thanks to the UNRIC Library staff for posting these useful guides online.

UNRIC Library Backgrounders
http://www.unric.org/en/unric-library-backgrounders

Backgrounders are available for the following countries:
Afghanistan
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
Gaza
Iraq
Kosovo
Libya
Mali
Myanmar
Somalia
South Sudan
Sudan/Darfur
Sri Lanka
Syria
Yemen

Backgrounders are available for the following topics:
Biodiversity
Climate Change
Desertification
Disability
Disarmament
Educational Resources
Food Waste
Forests
Genocide
Global Food Crisis
Human Rights
Human Rights Council
Middle East
Migration
Millennium Development Goals
Nuclear Disarmament
Nuclear Non-Proliferation
Participation of the European Union in the work of the United Nations
Peacebuilding Commission
Peacekeeping
Poverty
Protection of civilians in armed conflict
Racism
Responsibility to Protect (R2P)
Sustainable Development
Terrorism
Youth

Afghanistan Law Bibliography

Afghan Law Bibliography posted on the Afghan Analyst Web Site.

Afghanistan Law Bibliography

January 2011

Tim Mathews (University of Maine Law School)

http://afghanistan-analyst.org/Documents/AfghanistanLegalBibliography.pdf

“This bibliography is divided into eight sections.

1.References. Guides other than academic or research articles that provide broad background information

2.Afghan Law, In General. Broad topics related to Afghan legal systems and legal history

3.Customary Law. Afghan customary law and history

4.Islamic Law, In General. Articles focusing upon Sunni jurisprudence in both international and domestic areas of law

5.Islamic Law in Afghanistan. Articles focusing on Islamic law as applied in Afghanistan, to include functioning of courts of Sharia

6.State Codes and State Legal System. Functioning of state courts, administrative processes, and discussion of state codes

7.Constitution: Drafting and Law. Articles discussing Afghan constitutional law, constitutional drafting, and related issues

8.Rule of Law and Policy Issues. Post-conflict reconstruction, transitional justice, human rights, and security issues relevant to the legal system.”

 

Afghanistan: U.S. Rule of Law and Justice Sector Assistance

Following up on and related to an earlier post as to the Afghanistan Legal Education Project, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) has issued a 48-page report:

Afghanistan: U.S. Rule of Law and Justice Sector Assistance (Nov. 9, 2010)

The purpose and scope of the report are stated as “to provide background and analysis for Congress on U.S. rule of law (ROL) and justice sector assistance programs in Afghanistan … by defining ROL and the justice sector, describing the scope of the ROL problem in Afghanistan, including the role of corruption, and surveying the range of Afghan justice sector institutions.”

Hat tip to Docuticker.com.

Guide to Pakistani Militant Groups

IRIN Humanitarian News and Analysis has posted a guide to militant groups in Pakistan, which includes a brief list of sources. The guide provides the name, base of support, areas of operation, and targets for each group.

Pakistan: A Guide to Main Militant Groups

Oct 13, 2010

http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportID=90760

 

Afghanistan Legal Education Project

Stanford Law School just launched the Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Web site. Here you find the ALEP Blog, links, and full-text of publications, including “Introduction to the Law of Afghanistan” and “Introduction to Commercial Law of Afghanistan.” Additional resources are planned for the future.

Afghanistan Legal Education Project

http://www.afghanistanlegaleducation.com/

About  ALEP

Founded in 2007, the Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) at Stanford Law School is dedicated to developing innovative legal curricula to help Afghanistan’s universities train the next generation of lawyers and leaders.
Afghanistan’s legal sector requires urgent attention. While other institutions are transitioning more quickly, reconstruction of the legal system lags behind. At the heart of this problem is a dire shortage of qualified lawyers. Because the assistance of skilled practitioners is crucial to the efforts of the people of Afghanistan to reconstitute their justice system, training the attorneys that will guide the rebuilding of Afghanistan is of chief importance. The students of today in Afghanistan are also the leaders of today, and familiarity with the justice system is essential for them to work in government, business, and virtually any other field.
In 2007-08, ALEP developed an introductory textbook on the laws of Afghanistan based on Afghanistan’s 2004 Constitution and current legal codes. It was the first legal textbook specifically on the law of Afghanistan created in the last thirty years. Afghan and international law experts reviewed the textbook at a symposium hosted by Stanford University and during a trip by the ALEP team to Kabul in March 2008. The textbook is the foundation of the first Legal Studies class at the American University of Afghanistan (AUAF).
Already, over fifty students have taken the class, which was taught by Professor Mohammad Haroon Mutasem, Vice Dean of the Faculty of Law and Political Science at Kabul University and Lecturer in Law at AUAF. The introductory text will be available for free in Dari and Pashto by August 2009.
A common refrain among the students enrolled in the introductory law class was that they want still more offerings. To that end, in 2008-09, ALEP has continued to refine the introductory textbook and has drafted two new textbooks—one on commercial law and the other on criminal law. The textbooks will be taught in two new courses at AUAF in the fall and spring semesters 2009-2010, forming the core requirements of a certificate in law from AUAF.
In addition to writing textbooks, the ALEP team is in constant contact with rule of law experts in the region and at home in the United States. The project has forged a close alliance with the Afghanistan Legal Educators project at the University of Washington, of which Professor Mutasem is a graduate. In the future, ALEP will continue to write and develop textbooks and teaching materials for free distribution to AUAF and around Afghanistan