New Book – Researching Language and the Law: Textual Features and Translation Issues

Davide Simone Giannoni and Celina Frade’s new book “Researching Language and the Law: contains the following chapters that will be of interest to people studying legal translation and interpretation.

Researching Language and the Law: Textual Features and Translation Issues

Davide Simone Giannoni and Celina Frade

Bern: Perter Lang, 2010

Selected Book Chapters:

English Legal Discourse and the French Continuum

Susan Kermas

“What I argue in this chapter is that the unique language contact situation within the EU has triggered another phase of French influence. My examination of English and French legal documents in the Eur-Lex archive … will demonstate not only that many words have been influenced by French, but, more importantly, that efforts to harmonise legal language within the EU may also be creating a further rift between British and American legal discourse and subsequently, ordinary language.”

Axiological Analysis of Entries in a Spanish Law Dictionary and their English Equivalents

Angel M.  Felices Lago

 

Legal Translation and Interpreting in the UK Today

Francisco Vigier

The UK has two main translator and interpeter organizations, the Institute of Translation and Interpreting  and the Charted Institute of Linguists, which are recognised by the government and committed to promote quality in translation and interpreting services. Nonetheless, a translator or interpreter willing to practise in Britain is not bound to belong to any of them. . .”

 

Annotated Bibliography of Spanish-English Legal Translation and Interpretation

Professor Gladys Matthews of the College of Charleston reviews various Spanish langauge legal dictionaries and bilingual legal dictionaries in the following article available online:

An Annotated Bibliography of Spanish-English Legal Translation and Interpretation

Gladys Matthews

Proteus Newsletter of the National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators

Vol. 19,  No.1 (Spring 2010)

Pages 9-12.

Online version of article is only available to members of NAJIT.

http://www.najit.org/publications/proteus.php

Legal Interpreting and Translating: A Research Guide

Legal Interpreting and Translating: A Research Guide

Don Ford

FCIL Librarian, University of Iowa

Although the guide is specific to the Iowa Library System, the guide offers a nice bibliography of legal translation titles and a list of glossaries and dictionaries in 20 languages from Europe, Asia ,and Africa. Particularly useful are the links to online legal glosssaries from state courts covering the following languages: Arabic, Armenian, Cantonese, Chinese, German, Hindi, Hmong, Korean, Laotian, Punjabi,Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Urdu and Vietnamese.

http://www.law.uiowa.edu/documents/pathfinders/court_interpreter.pdf

Japanese Law Translation

Hap tip to Ben Jones for pointing out that these are unofficial translations.

Japan’s Ministry of Justice has a new Website that offers unofficial English translations of thousands of Japanese statutes and regulations. The site provides bilingual versions of the laws and regulations. It also includes lexicographic notes explaining the translation of difficult terms. Here is an example of Article 1 of the Copyright Act of 1970:

目的)

(Purpose)

第一条この法律は、著作物並びに実演、レコード、放送及び有線放送に関し著作者の権利及びこれに隣接する権利を定め、これらの文化的所産の公正な利用に留意しつつ、著作者等の権利の保護を図り、もつて文化の発展に寄与することを目的とする。

Article 1 The purpose of this Act is to provide for, and to secure protection of, the rights of authors, etc. and the rights neighboring thereto with respect [copyrightable] works as well as performances, phonograms, broadcasts and wire-broadcasts, while giving due regard to the fair exploitation of these cultural products, and by doing so, to contribute to the development of culture

The site’s bilingual dictionary is a wonderful resource that not only provides translations, but also links to statutes and regulations that use a specific term or phrase.

Japanese Law Translation

http://www.japaneselawtranslation.go.jp/

Article on evaluating English-Spanish legal dictionaries

Speaking of bilingual information…  In the latest issue of Law Library Journal, Dennis Kim Prieto of Rutgers Law Library offers a timely and useful article on bilingual English-Spanish dictionaries. He reviews the latest lexicographic research to undercover criteria by which to assess bilingual legal dictionaries. The annotated bibliography at the end of the article will prove useful to acquisitions librarians as they make decisions about which dictionaries to buy. Dennis’ article is a welcome addition to the understudied area of legal lexicography, especially in foreign languages.

Dennis Kim Prieto, En la tierra del ciego, el tuerco es rey: Problems With Current English-Spanish Legal Dictionaries, and Notes Toward a Critical Comparative Legal Lexicography, 100 L. Libr. J. 251 (2008).  

 

 

http://www.aallnet.org/products/pub_llj_v100n02/2008-14.pdf