Diplomat’s Handbook for Democracy Development Support

Diplomat’s Handbook for Democracy Development Support 2nd ed.

http://diplomatshandbook.org/_resource.html

http://diplomatshandbook.org/pdf/Diplomats_Handbook.pdf

Table of Contents

Preface by President Vaclav Havel

Ministers’ ForewordChapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: The International Context

Chapter 3: The Diplomat’s Toolbox

Chapter 4: Conclusions

CASE STUDIES:

Cuban Exceptionalism

Egypt: Will Democracy Succeed the Pharaoh

China’s Fifth Modernization: the Enduring Hope for Democratic Governance

South Africa: “The Long Road to Freedom”

From Independence to Real Democracy – Ukraine’s Orange Revolution

The Fall and Rise of Chilean Democracy: 1973-1989

Belarus: Europe’s Last Dictator?

The Suffering of Burma/Myanmar

Zimbabwe: From Hope to Crisis

Tanzania’s Road to Multi-Party Democracy: Focus on a Single Mission’s Efforts

Found online at http://www.diplomatshandbook.org/Tanzania

Sierra Leone: Belated International Engagement Ends a War, Helps Consolidate a Fragile Democracy. Found online at http://www.diplomatshandbook.org/SierraLeone

Resource List: Donor Organizations, Other Democracy Support Organizations and Election Assistance and Observation Organizations

Annex: International Human Rights Law

From the description:

The Diplomat’s Handbook is a project commissioned by the Community of Democracies, and produced by the Council for a Community of Democracies (CCD). The First Edition was produced with the financial support of the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict, Freedom House, the Princeton Project on National Security, the US Department of State, the Governments of Chile, India, and Morocco, and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade of the Government of Canada.

The Handbook project was conceived by Ambassador Mark Palmer. Preparation of the Handbook has been a partnership between Project Head, Ambassador Jeremy Kinsman (jeremykinsman@diplomatshandbook.org), who has been principally responsible for the text of the Handbook itself, and the Director of Research, Kurt Bassuener (kurtbassuener@diplomatshandbook.org), who has been principally responsible for producing the Handbook’s case studies

The text which follows and the case studies benefit from the generous contributions and advice of many former and current diplomatic practitioners, scholars, members of policy centers and nongovernmental organizations, and development experts. The case study on China was drafted by Chantal Meagher, the case study on Cuba by Jeremy Kinsman, and the case study on Egypt by a variety of experts, including Stephen McInerney, Moataz El Fegiery, Michele Dunne and Issandr El Amrani. The Belarus and Ukraine case study updates were undertaken with the assistance of Iryna Chupryna of the Democratization Policy Council.

 

 

Lord Owen Report on British Policy on Iran 1974-1978

The UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office has released the previously confidently Owen Report on British Policy on Iran 1974-1978.

This report covers the fall of the Shah and the rise of the Islamic Republic.

http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/about-us/who-we-are/our-history/historical-publications/documents-british-policy/british-policy-on-iran-1974-1978

From the description:

The Islamic Revolution in Iran represented a seismic shift in the internal and geopolitical orientation of a formerly close ally of the United Kingdom.

This document, now released for the first time, was commissioned in 1979 by the then Foreign Secretary, the Rt Hon David (now Lord) Owen, in order to enable a detailed examination of the context of the events leading to the Revolution, and for the FCO to identify any lessons that might be learned from the UK’s reactions to, and analysis of, the events concerned.

The intention, as mentioned by the then Permanent Under-Secretary in his foreword, was not to apportion blame for the fact that the FCO, in common with others, failed to predict the Islamic Revolution. Rather, the intention was to “examine where, if anywhere, we had gone wrong and how we could do better in the future”. In this context Chapter XI, “Conclusion: Lessons for the FCO”, is of particular interest.

As a whole, this document shows the value of analysis and historical perspective in formulating policy not just with regard to the Islamic Republic of Iran, but to other countries and regions which remain of vital interest to the UK.

It is important to bear in mind that this is a historical document and does not necessarily reflect the views of the current UK government. It has been released for publication on the web following the FCO’s standard clearance procedures.

 

VOA pronunciation guides for foreign names

Voice of America provides a pronunciation guide for names of foreign leaders and dignitaries. Type  in a name or choose from an alphabetical list.

Example of Sergio Viera de Mello from the VOA site. In addition to the written phonetic spelling, the site also provides an audio file of name being spoken in translation.

DE MELLO, SERGIO VIERA Brazil SEH-zhee-o vee-A-rah day MEH-lo  

VOA Pronunciation Guide

http://names.voa.gov/index.cfm

Hat tip to Prof. Peggy McGuinness