FT Supplement: Future of Islamic Finance

Tuesday’s Financial Times includes a seven page special report on Islamic finance involving various parts o f the globe, not  just the Middle East.

The Future of Islamic Finance

Financial Times

Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010

http://www.ft.com/reports/islamic-finance-dec-2010

Table of Contents

Growth Survives the Storms: safe investments and sizeable potential markets continue to buoy the sector.

North Africa: A Region Abounding with Potential. Egypt leads among nations seen as ripe for expansion.

Malaysia Seeks End to Slide in Issuance: tax breaks and other initiatives are aimed at bolstering the sector’s leading market.

UAE: Shadow  of $26bn Upset Strats to Fade: borrowers are back after Dubai World’s successful restructuring.

Investment Banks: Nascent Sector looks for New Model: crisis-savaged organizatiosn need to diversify.

Europe: London and Paris Battle for Business: The City looks unlikely to be ousted from its position of strength.

US: Presence and Role of Market Remain marginal. Activity has been subdued since the Nakheel crisis.

 

 

 

 

Future of Islamic Finance

Teh Financial Times has posted a special report on the Future of Islamic Banking:

http://www.ft.com/islamicfinance

Pdf of the December 8, 2009 print supplement available at:

http://media.ft.com/cms/ac6257de-e2de-11de-b028-00144feab49a.pdf

“Pay-out to staff as Bloomberg sales fall”

This is the headline in today’s Financial Times.  The article, written by Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, reports that:

“In a rare disclosure by the privately held news and data company, Bloomberg said its total terminal numbers had fallen by 11,470 or 4 per cent, from a peak last November of 268,800.”

However, even with the drop in the sale of terminals, revenues for Bloomberg in the last year have risen from $5.8 billion dollars to $6.2 billion dollars and  Bloomberg is ‘planning to add 1000 employees’.

News Publishers and the iPhone

I was speaking at a law school panel discussion a couple of months ago.  The session was being recorded, and the technician was using wireless microphones.  He was picking up interference during sound checks and asked the six or seven law students who were on the panel if they had iPhones, and if they could turn them off if so.  It seemed to me  that  just about every student, and certainly a majority, reached into his or her pocket and pulled out an iPhone.

What made me think of this incident is a Technology story in tomorrow’s Wall Street Journal, “Publishers Nurture Rivals to Kindle,” by Shira Ovide and Geoffrey A. Fowler.  The article talks about a number of efforts by different publishers teaming up with companies such as FirstPaper LLC ., Plastic Logic Ltd., and E Ink Corp.

What especially caught my eye was this paragraph:

Some publishers also are focusing their portable-reading efforts on devices people already use. The new iPhone applications store rolling out this summer will support subscription prices, spurring the Financial Times, Time Inc. and other publishers to tinker with ways to offer subscriptions on the iPhone. Last week, Amazon bought a small startup that makes free e-book reading application Stanza for the iPhone.

I think that they might really be on to something.