After Google Book Search: Rebooting the Digital Library

“After Google Book Search: Rebooting the Digital Library” 
University of Chicago Law & Economics, Olin Working Paper No. 559

RANDAL C. PICKER, University of Chicago – Law School

The rejection of the Google Book Search settlement means that we are at a point of rebooting how we design our digital library future. There were many criticisms of GBS and the settlement but perhaps chief among those was the risk that approval of the settlement would have locked in a single approach to digital libraries. Google would have received unique access to the so-called orphan works and that would have provided it what may have been a decisive advantage against digital library competitors, both private and public. As we move forward on the orphan works, we need to do so with two principles in mind. First, we need to enable broad competing uses of the orphan works while, to the greatest extent possible, respecting the rights of the orphan works holders. Second, we should not repeat the mistake of the GBS settlement by somehow tilting the table in favor of digital library monopoly, either public or private.

We should want to foster a rich digital library ecosystem. GBS makes clear that we can have large-scale private digital libraries. That is an important development and one that we should seek to enable. If we create use rights for copyrighted works for digital libraries, we should be sure to make those privileges available to both public digital libraries and private digital libraries such as GBS and its successors. Our existing statutory safe harbors for libraries favor noncommercial libraries and archives. The emergence of GBS suggests that that is too narrow a conception of what libraries can be in the digital age and we need a statutory scheme that supports that.

Source: LSN: University of Chicago Law School, Law & Economics Research Paper Series Vol. 13 No. 4, 06/27/2011

 

Google Books in the News

European Union to scrutinize Google Books settlement; Congress may hold hearing

“The European Union said today that it would scrutinize Google’s settlement with authors and publishers and hold a hearing Sept. 7 to determine whether there would be any adverse impact on the European book market. “What’s currently planned is a fact-finding exercise by the [European] Commission — not an investigation — and we’re looking forward to taking part,” said Jennie Johnson, a Google spokeswoman. Under scrutiny will be Google’s agreement, reached last year with the Authors Guild and the American Association of Publishers, to make out-of-print books searchable online.”

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2009/07/european-union-to-scrutinize-google-books-settlement.html

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Texas expand Google Books agreements

“In May, the University of Michigan announced an expanded agreement with Google that will take advantage of our settlement agreement to make millions of works from its library collection accessible to readers, researchers, and book lovers across the United States. Today, two more longstanding library partners–the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas–have also expanded their partnerships with Google. That means that if the agreement is approved by the court, anyone in the US will be able to find, preview and buy online access to books from these two libraries as well.”

http://booksearch.blogspot.com/2009/07/university-of-wisconsin-madison-and.html

 

Google Library Project Settlement: What It Means for Publishers

SPONSORED BY: Google, The Association of American Publishers, and Publishers Weekly 

EVENT DATE: Wednesday, July 29, 2 pm ET Time — 60 minutes 

“In a webinar first, the leaders involved with the crafting of the Google Library Project Settlement will share with the publishing industry the benefits of the agreement for publishers and authors. If approved by the Court in October, the agreement will create one of the most far-reaching intellectual, cultural, and commercial platforms for access to digital books for the reading public, while granting publishers unprecedented opportunities and protections. Presented in collaboration with Google, The Association of American Publishers, and Publishers Weekly, the web session is a must-attend event for publishers everywhere.”

https://event.on24.com/eventRegistration/EventLobbyServlet?target=registration.jsp&eventid=156420&sessionid=1&key=7EF08275BD027B4FA08C48D022C8087D&sourcepage=register

 

Copyfraud: Poisoning the public domain

“The public domain is the greatest resource in human history: eventually all knowledge will become part of it. Its riches serve all mankind, but it faces a new threat. Vast libraries of public domain works are being plundered by claims of “copyright”. It’s called copyfraud – and we’ll discover how large corporations like Google, Yahoo, and Amazon have structured their businesses to assist it and profit from it.”

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/06/26/copyfraud/

 

Give Your Input On the Google Book Search Settlement

“Publishers Weekly would like your input on the Google Book Search Settlement (from PW) and they are conducting a survey designed to gather a broad view of how the Settlement is being viewed.. . . . If you’re interested, take a few minutes to answer this brief, targeted questionnaire to help gauge industry opinion on whether the settlement should be approved, modified or rejected. Note that you do not have to have standing in the suit to participate in the survey. Please click on this link when you are ready to take the survey.”

http://lisnews.org/give_your_input_google_book_search_settlement

 


 
Source:  The always excellent Intersect Alert.
The Intersect Alert is a newsletter of the Government Relations Committee, San Francisco Bay Region Chapter, Special Libraries Association

http://units.sla.org/chapter/csfo/csfo.html

Google Book Search Bibliography

Google Book Search Bibliography

by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
Publisher, Digital Scholarship
http://www.digital-scholarship.org/

This bibliography presents selected English-language articles and other works that are useful in understanding Google Book Search. It primarily focuses on the evolution of Google Book Search and the legal, library, and social issues associated with it. . . .

Source:  The Chronicle of Higher Education The Wired CampusThe post, by Catherine Rampell notes that the author of the bibliography, Charles W. Bailey, Jr.,

 . . . has written extensively about Google Book Search as well as open access and e-books.

 

Note: The Stanford Law Library is a participant in the Google Books project.  Here’s more information about Stanford’s involvement.

 

And today Mr. Bailey just posted to law-lib a post about his  “Version 72, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography.”

Version 72 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available from Digital Scholarship. This selective bibliography presents over 3,250 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that areuseful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

This version adds hundreds of links to freely availablejournal articles from publishers as well as to e-prints ofpublished articles housed in disciplinary archives and institutional repositories. All article references were checked for the availability of such free content.

. . .