Stanford China Law & Policy Conference May 6 & 7, 2011

The Inaugural Stanford China Law & Policy Conference

Law and the Chinese Transformation

May 6-7, 2011

Stanford Law School

About the Event:  The Stanford China Law & Policy Association is hosting the inaugural China Law & Policy Conference that will take place on May 6-7, 2011.  The title of the conference is “Law and the Chinese Transformation.”  This event is co-sponsored by the Rock Center for Corporate Governance.

 

The Conference brings together prominent experts on Chinese law, politics, and business to begin productive conversations about the most pressing issues in Chinese legal, political, and corporate governance reform.  Dean Larry Kramer will give opening remarks.  Dr. Condoleezza Rice, former Secretary of State, will deliver the keynote speech.  GAO Zhansheng, Consul General of the People’s Republic of China in San Francisco, will deliver a special luncheon speech.

 

Confirmed panelists and moderators from China include:

Honorable WANG Yanfang, IP Tribunal of the Supreme People’s Court of China

SHEN Weixing, Vice Dean of Tsinghua University Law School, China

WANG Xixin, Vice Dean of Peking University Law School, China

Jeff Lehman, Founding Dean of the Peking University School of Transnational Law, China

XIAO Wei, Managing Partner, Jun He Law Offices

 

Confirmed panelists and moderators from the US include:

Brad Berenson, Partner, Sidley Austin

Nancy Boswell, President and CEO, Transparency International – USA

Juan Botero, Rule of Law Index Director, The World Justice Project

Brian Cabrera, General Counsel, Synopsys

Carmen Chang, Partner, Wilson Sonsini

Chuck Comey, Partner, MOFO

Marc Fagel, Regional Director, SEC in San Francisco

Mei Gechlik, Lecturer, Stanford Law School

Paul Goldstein, Professor, Stanford Law School

Joe Grundfest, Professor, Stanford Law School

Mike Klausner, Professor, Stanford Law School

Larry Kramer, Dean of Stanford Law School

David Lee, Partner, Orrick

Yabo Lin, Partner, Sidley & Austin

Paul Marquardt, Partner, Cleary Gottlieb

Ken Nguyen, Stanford Law School

John Quinn, Managing Partner, Quinn Emanuel

Joe Simone, Partner, Baker McKenzie

Laura Stein, General Counsel, Clorox

Alan Sykes, Professor, Stanford Law School

Bill Treanor, Dean of Georgetown University Law Center

Honorable Clifford Wallace, Ninth Circuit

 

The conference will hold six panels discussing the various legal implications of a rising China.  These panels include:

I.             Legal Education in China and the US

II.            The Development of Rule of Law in China

III.           IP protection and Enforcement in China

IV.          Cross-border Acquisitions and Investments

V.            Foreign Corruption Practice Act and its Applications to Business Operations in China

VI.          Opportunities and Challenges for the Legal Profession

 

Registration Information:

Registration is free, but required for all participants.  Please register at http://www.stanford.edu/dept/law/forms/chinalaw_participants.fb

CLE credits will be offered to practicing attorneys for attending the conference.

Questions?  If you have any questions, please contact: Sandy Yao at sandyyao@stanford.edu or Michelle Yuan at yyuan1@stanford.edu.

 

WIPO Lex

UN Pulse reports that the World Intellectual Property Organization has formally released WIPO  Lex, a portal of IP legislation and treaties searchable by country and subject.

http://www.wipo.int/wipolex/en/

From the WIPO description:

“WIPO Lex is a one-stop search facility for national laws and treaties on intellectual property (IP) of WIPO, WTO and UN Members. It also features related information which elaborates, analyzes and interprets these laws and treaties. It provides streamlined access to reference material of key importance for optimal information on the global IP System.”

Code, Access to Knowledge and the Law: The Governance of Knowledge in the Digital Age

Code, Access to Knowledge and the Law: The Governance of Knowledge in the Digital Age

by Antonios G. Broumas, University of Athens

Abstract:
“This paper endeavours to clarify the role of technology in the governance of knowledge in the networked information society. Its central argument is that modern technologies of control, deployed as they are by powerful actors, tend to indiscriminately exclude access to knowledge, and, as a result, impede the dramatic potential of the digital age. In the process of underpinning the above thesis, the patterns of interrelation between code and the law and their influence on the networked information society are examined. It is argued that the existing equilibrium between control and A2K is disproportionately disposed toward specific private interests, originating primarily from powerful market players of traditional industrial sectors, while generally disregarding other private interests, or indeed the interest of the public as a whole. The paper concludes by calling for more equitable and balanced equilibria between control and A2K, implemented in a model of governance more clearly orientated towards social and economic development.”

Source: Legal Information & Technology Abstracts, Vol. 2, No. 4 (2/9/2010)