Libraries in Japan – Save The Library

Our friends in Japan are dealing with more pressing problems, but librarians in Japan have created a Web site  called “Save The Library” to help libraries impacted by the earthquake and tsunami.

The Wiki is posting information on disaster management, recruitment of volunteers, and expedited ILL, among other topics. Most postings are in Japanese.

Save The Library

http://www45.atwiki.jp/savelibrary/

Hat tip to Takako Okada.

Index Database to Japanese Laws, Regulations and Bills

From one of the latest issues of the National Diet Library Newsletter (No. 173, June 2010)

http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/publication/ndl_newsletter/173/736.html

In May 2010, the Index Database to Japanese Laws, Regulations and Bills (Japanese only) was renewed.

Along with the Index Database to Laws and Regulations in early Meiji Japan (Japanese only), this database makes searchable information on Japanese laws from the formation of modern nation to the present.

  • Improvements are as follows:
  • ■Texts of the laws and regulations provided by national institutions via the Internet are linked and referable from index information.
  • ■Information on the bills introduced in the Imperial Diet (1890 to 1947) is added.
  • ■Other improvements
  • URL of the index information is fixed, which enables the users to bookmark a specific law or regulation.
  • Link to the Index Database to Laws and Regulations in early Meiji Japan is established.

Index Database to Japanese Laws, Regulations and Bills (Japanese language only)

http://hourei.ndl.go.jp/SearchSys/

  • Popular names of laws and regulations and classification of active laws are shown in the search results.
  • Legal Interpreting and Translating: A Research Guide

    Legal Interpreting and Translating: A Research Guide

    Don Ford

    FCIL Librarian, University of Iowa

    Although the guide is specific to the Iowa Library System, the guide offers a nice bibliography of legal translation titles and a list of glossaries and dictionaries in 20 languages from Europe, Asia ,and Africa. Particularly useful are the links to online legal glosssaries from state courts covering the following languages: Arabic, Armenian, Cantonese, Chinese, German, Hindi, Hmong, Korean, Laotian, Punjabi,Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Urdu and Vietnamese.

    http://www.law.uiowa.edu/documents/pathfinders/court_interpreter.pdf