Ending Copyright Claims in State Primary Legal Materials

Katie Fortney —  a recent San Jose State University (SJSU) School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) graduate (MLIS) and Librarian and Docketing Clerk at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP in Palo Alto, California, as well as a former intern at the Robert Crown Law Library at Stanford Law School — has contributed “Ending Copyright Claims in State Primary Legal Materials: Toward an Open Source Legal System” in the latest issue of Law Library Journal, vol. 102(1), pages 59-68.

As stated — importantly — in the abstract to her article:

An informed democratic society needs open access to the law, but states’ attempts to protect copyright interests in their laws are a major roadblock [boldface added].

She considers, among other things, the complexity of copyright law for state and local government works, plus how that law could be changed (by 3 main avenues: legislation, litigation, and persuasion).

Towards an Open Source Legal Operating System

Here’s an article by Katie Fortney, who was an intern at our library.

Abstract:     
An informed democratic society needs open access to the law, but states’ attempts to protect copyright interests in their laws are a major roadblock. This article urges broader access, analyzes the implications and legal arguments for and against copyright in the law, and considers strategies for access advocacy.

Fortney, Katie,Towards an Open Source Legal Operating System(February 20, 2009). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1347158