Eunomía: Revista en Cultura de la Legaildad

Spanish publisher Tirant lo Blanch has released volume 1 of the peer-reviewed journal “Eunomía Revista en Cultura de la Legaildad.”
ISSN: 2253-6655.

The journal will publish interdisciplinary articles on philosophical, theoretical and scientific approaches to law and legal culture. Contributions from legal scholars, sociologists, philosophers, and political scientists around the world are welcome.

According to the editors’ open letter to readers and authors, Eunomia was the Greek goddess of “good order” or “good laws.” Eunomia  was often depicted as one of the three Horae, which included Dike (goddess of justice) and Eirene (goddess of peace).

Each journal issue consists of five parts:
1. Estudios – in-depth articles on specific topics.
2. Foro y Agora (forum and agora) – shorter, more topical pieces.
3. Voces de Cultura de la Legalidad  (voices of the culture of law) – explorations of legal concepts.
4. Releyendo (re-reading) – commentary on a classic legal text.
5. Rincón de lecturas (reading corner) – book reviews.

Full-text of journal content is freely available at
http://eunomia.tirant.com/

Table of contents of selected articles from volume 1:
Twelve Questions on Principia iuris
Multicultural Jurisdiction in the Liberal State: A Critical Assessment
In Defense of the Dignity of Law
2010 Amendment to the Spanish PenaI Code
Political Immunities in Italy: Between Protection Measures and Privilege
The Eradication of the Torture as a Legal Objective: the Highs and the Lows of the Contribution of  International Law

All articles are in Spanish, but abstracts and keywords are available in English.

Journal: Transnational Legal Theory

Hart Publishing has released Volume 1 of a new journal: Transnational Legal Theory

Transnational Legal Theory
TOC, Volume 1 Issue 1 2010
 
Articles
 
Pluralism in Postnational Risk Regulation: The Dispute Over GMOs and Trade         
Nico Krisch
                                                                                                           
Human Rights in the Emerging World Order  
Joseph Raz                                
 
Transnational Governance by Local Rules: How a Global Economic Policy Perspective Could Help    
Dan Danielsen                         
 
Reviews
 
Global Legal Pluralism and “Private” International Law           
Paul Berman
 
Jus in bello Through the Lens of Individual Moral Responsibility: McMahan on Killing in War           
David Lefkowitz
 
Human Rights qua Normative Practice – Sui generis or legal?
Samantha Besson         
           
The Pursuit of a Worthwhile Life: Griffin on Human Rights  
Terrance McConnell

Journal Description

The objective of Transnational Legal Theory is to publish high-quality theoretical scholarship that addresses transnational dimensions of law and legal dimensions of transnational fields and activity.

Central to Transnational Legal Theory‘s mandate is publication of work that explores whether and how transnational contexts, forces and ideations affect debates within existing traditions or schools of legal thought. Similarly, the journal aspires to encourage scholars debating general theories about law to consider the relevance of transnational contexts and dimensions for their work. With respect to particular jurisprudence, the journal welcomes not only submissions that involve theoretical explorations of fields commonly constructed as transnational in nature (such as commercial law, maritime law, or cyberlaw) but also explorations of transnational aspects of fields less commonly understood in this way (for example, criminal law, family law, company law, tort law, evidence law, and so on). Submissions of work exploring process-oriented approaches to law as transnational (from transjurisdictional litigation to delocalized arbitration to multi-level governance) are also encouraged.

Equally central to Transnational Legal Theory‘s mandate is theoretical work that explores fresh (or revived) understandings of international law and comparative law ‘beyond the state’ (and the interstate). The journal has a special interest in submissions that explore the interfaces, intersections, and mutual embeddedness of public international law, private international law, and comparative law, notably in terms of whether such inter-relationships are reshaping these sub-disciplines in directions that are, in important respects, transnational in nature. Other areas of interest for the journal include the interaction of systems or orders along such axes as the following examples: constitutional law theory on the reception of various forms of external law by states’ legal orders; jurisdictional theory on the external projection of states’ legal orders; public law theory on the evolution of regional legal orders; panstate religious normativity; and the theorization of law as “global” in preference or contradistinction to law as either international or transnational. Legal theory is understood broadly to encompass a variety of inter- and subdisciplinary theoretical approaches to law or to law-like normativity, including, to name only some, philosophy of law, legal sociology, legal history, law and economics, and international relations theory 

The objective of Transnational Legal Theory is to publish high-quality theoretical scholarship that addresses transnational dimensions of law and legal dimensions of transnational fields and activity.

Central to Transnational Legal Theory‘s mandate is publication of work that explores whether and how transnational contexts, forces and ideations affect debates within existing traditions or schools of legal thought. Similarly, the journal aspires to encourage scholars debating general theories about law to consider the relevance of transnational contexts and dimensions for their work. With respect to particular jurisprudence, the journal welcomes not only submissions that involve theoretical explorations of fields commonly constructed as transnational in nature (such as commercial law, maritime law, or cyberlaw) but also explorations of transnational aspects of fields less commonly understood in this way (for example, criminal law, family law, company law, tort law, evidence law, and so on). Submissions of work exploring process-oriented approaches to law as transnational (from transjurisdictional litigation to delocalized arbitration to multi-level governance) are also encouraged.

Equally central to Transnational Legal Theory‘s mandate is theoretical work that explores fresh (or revived) understandings of international law and comparative law ‘beyond the state’ (and the interstate). The journal has a special interest in submissions that explore the interfaces, intersections, and mutual embeddedness of public international law, private international law, and comparative law, notably in terms of whether such inter-relationships are reshaping these sub-disciplines in directions that are, in important respects, transnational in nature. Other areas of interest for the journal include the interaction of systems or orders along such axes as the following examples: constitutional law theory on the reception of various forms of external law by states’ legal orders; jurisdictional theory on the external projection of states’ legal orders; public law theory on the evolution of regional legal orders; panstate religious normativity; and the theorization of law as “global” in preference or contradistinction to law as either international or transnational. Legal theory is understood broadly to encompass a variety of inter- and subdisciplinary theoretical approaches to law or to law-like normativity, including, to name only some, philosophy of law, legal sociology, legal history, law and economics, and international relations theory