Hip High Hires Hein

Mainly for its debate team – see below.

There are numerous ways to keep up with developments in legal bibliography and legal research.  Blogs bring lots of news about legal research plus more.  Twitter is great for breaking developments and news (some of my favorites here include @aabibliographer, @EJWalters, @glambert, @jasnwilsn, and the amazingly good @lawlib).  Visiting the vendor booths and demonstrations at the conference exhibit hall, while one of my very least-favorite things to do, is also useful for learning the latest and greatest. 

But there’s no substitute for face-to-face meetings with vendor representatives.  Here at Stanford we always look forward to our more-or-less annual visit from Steve Roses, our HeinOnline representative.  Steve is personable, highly intelligent, and shares his passion for his products with us — he’s less a salesperson and more a partner in our research efforts.  And we always learn something new.  During Steve’s last visit  here, while we were chatting about this and that, Steve mentioned that Hein had just acquired its first high school customer, a high school in Texas.  I found that tidbit intriguing and shared it with my class; one of the students later e-mailed me a note, “I have a friend who went to [that high school*].  It’s a very achievement oriented high school!”

*The school wishes to remain anonymous.

I shared that information with Steve and he recently wrote to me that Hein now has its second high school customer:  Loyola High School in Los Angeles.

The school’s library director, April Hannah, reports that the school acquired the database primarily for its debate team and she is delighted that she can provide an affordable legal database to the team and its coaches (they just can’t afford LexisNexis she wrote in an e-mail).

I’m really impressed.  How many times have we reference librarians received a request from a patron who was looking for a certain law review article and threw up their hands saying “I couldn’t find it in Lexis or Westlaw.”  So many students find LexisNexis and Westlaw to be the be-all and end-all for, well, everything.  It’s always a pleasant revelation when we show the students (and faculty) how they can locate secondary sources plus a huge corpus of law review content, read compiled legislative histories, find the Federal Register going back to the beginning of time, plus lots more, and all without worrying, or even thinking about, search charges.

And I just can’t wait until the kids from Loyola High School make their way to law school!

(The high school, by the way, was the subject of a MSNBC segment on community service – you can watch the clip here

http://vimeo.com/13773712 )

Data on Chinese Legal System and Law Schools

Steve Roses and Chang Wang of  Thomson Reuters recently offered a Webinar on the Chinese Legal System and their WestlawChina database. As part of their presentation, they reported the following information about China:

1986 = 989,409 civil cases

2007 = 5,333,546 civil cases

 

40,000 laws and regulations issued since 1978.

 

Over 800 international arbitral awards each year.

 

143,000 attorneys in 2008 (up from 40,000 in 1993)

 

Lawyers per population

China  1:8.500

U.S. 1:300

 

Over 630 law schools and law departments with 244,121 law students.

 

12% pass rate for the Chinese bar exam.

 

Unfortunately, they did not provide sources for the information, but it does paint an interesting picture of the legal system and legal education in China. Many thanks to Steve and Chang for sharing their expertise and data.