East Asian Law Journal

Airiti Press of Taiwan has released the inaugural issue of the East Asian Law Journal , which will publish articles in English and Chinese. Two issues published per year. Editorial Board members hail from National Taiwan University.

East Asian Law Journal  東亞法學評論

http://www.airitipress.com/index.aspx?func=journaldetail&PublicationID=201003260001

Vo.l1 No. 1. March 2010.

Table of Contents

Where Does Law Originate From.

Adoption and Further Developments of the Concept of Militant Democracy in Taiwan.

The Case Flexibility Compromises Stability of Law: A Decade Review of Taiwanese Supreme Court Criminal Judgments.

Constitutionalism in Germany.

Poland’s History and Adoption of the Constitutional Law

An Introductory Note on the 2009 New Act to Amend the Antimonopoly Act and the Exclusionary Private Monopolization.

GlobalEconomic Crisis and Competition Law.

Financial Regulatory Reform in the Post-Crisis Era.

Costs and Funding of Civil Litigation: A Comparative Study

Christopher  Hodges, Stefan Vogenauer and Magdalena Tubilacka have published the following article on SSRN:   Costs and Funding of Civil Litigation: A Comparative Study.

Costs and Funding of Civil Litigation: A Comparative Study

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1511714

Countries studied are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, England and Wales, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Scotland, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, USA.  

The Appendices look very interesting

I. Questionnaire 49

II. Contributors to the Comparative Study 53

III. Ranges of Lawyers’ Hourly Rates 55

IV. Case Studies: Minimum costs risk for claimant 58

V. Summaries of amounts of Court Fees and Lawyers’ Fees 73

VI. Success and Contingency Fees 81

VII. Abbreviations 83

New Book: Scholarly Communication in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and Taiwan

Chandos publishing recently released a new mongraph: “Scholarly Communication in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and Taiwan.” This work is edited by Xia Jingfeng, a reference librarian at Rutgers. It will be interesting to see if any regional repositories, open source platforms, or informal exchanges are emerging in these East Asian jursidictions.  Hat tip to the Tao Yang at Rutgers for alerting us to this interesting new title.

Summary from the Publisher’s Website:

This is one of the very few books that systematically explores the characteristics of scholarly communication outside the West. Over the last decade the advances in information technology have remodelled the foundation of scholarly communication. This book examines how countries/regions in East Asia (China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan) have reacted to the innovations in the conduct of research and in the exchange of ideas. It outlines the traditional systems of scholarly exchange in China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, and then concentrates on the efforts of these countries/regions to provide revolutionary ways of writing, publishing, and reading of information produced by members of the academic community. It also discusses the achievements as well as challenges in the process of technology innovations, highlighting the uniqueness of practices in scholarly communication in this part of the world.

http://www.chandospublishing.com/chandos_publishing_record_detail.php?ID=163 

This is the final post from the Rocky Mountain branch of Legal Research Plus. Many thanks to our friends at the University of Denver Westminster Law Library for their help these past weeks. I look forward to joining my colleagues in Palo Alto for future postings.